World’s Happiest Countries


Finland did it again this year — it’s the World’s Most Happiest country for the year 2022, according to CNN Travel news. This ranking is determined by “World Happiness Report, a publication of the UN Sustainable Development Solutions Network that draws on global survey data from people in about 150 countries”.

For the fifth year in a row, Finland is the world’s happiest country, according to World Happiness Report rankings based largely on life evaluations from the Gallup World Poll.

Denmark comes in at No. 2 in this year’s rankings, followed by Iceland at No. 3. Sweden and Norway are seventh and eighth, respectively.

– CNN Travel

According to this report, the United States ranks at sixteen place. “Canada (No. 15), the United States (No. 16) and the United Kingdom (No. 17) all made it into the top 20,” writes CNN Travel.

John Helliwell, one of the report’s three founding editors, told CNN Travel “The big surprise was that globally, in an uncoordinated way, there have been very large increases in all the three forms of benevolence that are asked about in the Gallup World Poll.”

But in general, people are too pessimistic about the goodwill in the societies they live in, so then when the actual disaster happens and they see other people responding positively to help others, it raises their opinion both of themselves and of their fellow citizens.

I think part of that is people knew a little more what they were dealing with in the second year, even if there were new surprises.

And so you find both trust in others and general life evaluations often rise in times when you think ‘these are bad times,’ but what’s happening is people are working together to deal with them.

– John Helliwell, who is a professor emeritus at the Vancouver School of Economics, University of British Columbia.

“It’s conceivable some people seeing what war can do close up on their television screens every day to the lives of people who have nothing to do with war and want nothing to do with war can make them feel lucky they’re not there or empathetic to the point of pain for the people who are there. And they’re both real and understandable emotions, but they’re playing on opposite sides of the balance.” Helliwell told CNN Travel.

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